Furthermore, the inter-clinician agreement ranged from 50 to 67% with poor-to-moder-ate kappa indexes (Table 1). Agreement among the three clinicians was observed for 33 (40.2%) reports (6 “high probability,” 17 “no conclusion,” and 10 “diagnosis excluded”).

When we considered the nuclear medicine physicians’ standardized conclusions, 21 lung scans (25.6%) were classified “high probability” and 20 (24.4%) “diagnosis excluded” (Table 2). The kappa indexes for agreement of the clinicians with the nuclear medicine physicians’ standardized conclusions were poor to moderate (Table 2) more canadian health mall. Agreement among the three clinicians and the standardized conclusions was observed for 27 (32.9%) reports (6 “high probability,” 16 “no conclusion,” and 5 “diagnosis excluded”).

Disagreement between the internist and the standardized conclusions was mainly observed for lung scans with “high probability” and “diagnosis excluded” classifications, whereas for the intensive care specialist the disagreement was essentially observed for those classified “no conclusion” (Table 2). For the cardiologist, the disagreement was not statistically different among the three diagnostic categories.

Table 2—Agreement Among Clinicians According to the Nuclear Medicine Physicians’ Standardized Conclusions
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